Adobe Celebrates the world’s cheesiest stock photos by sticking them on T-Shirts

We’ve all seen something that’s so bad it’s brilliant. For example, stock photos. You know the ones I’m talking about – the kind that features carefully set-up situations showing things like “smiling woman using computer in office,” or “well-dressed man smiles at phone,” or, maybe “man smiles for no reason eating an apple.”

It’s fair to say that these photos are so corny that they make some of your dad’s jokes look like they were carefully curated by comedy geniuses, especially as some of the images have the ability to provoke grimaces of discomfort among creative people who are looking to use specific photos in their latest projects.

To celebrate the existence of these infamous snaps, and to promote their own brand spanking new stock service, Adobe has recently selected a few of its favourites and decided to print them on clothing and other apparel!

Continue reading “Adobe Celebrates the world’s cheesiest stock photos by sticking them on T-Shirts”

Ted Baker Claims a Fashion First With Google Collaboration

Ted Baker, the British luxury fashion label, has unveiled their latest marketing campaign and it’s brilliant. Dubbed “Mission Impeccable”, the multi-channel campaign features a classy video, excellent social media marketing and a first for the fashion industry as they’ve teamed up with Google to create brilliant interactive windows at their stores.

The campaign was designed so that it’s primarily digital and it all centres around a brilliant spy theme with a three-minute movie that lists Guy Ritchie as the executive producer.

Continue reading “Ted Baker Claims a Fashion First With Google Collaboration”

The 90’s are back! And it’s reclaiming the T-Shirt

Fashion does circles. This is something that I’ve been told time and time again.

Something that is currently in fashion, will soon be out of fashion and then it’ll be back in fashion.

One thing that has been in style for years but is making a huge comeback in recent times is the humble T-Shirt.

By this, I mean that casual T-Shirts seem have taken over the runways of some of the biggest labels, including the likes of Chanel and Dolce & Gabbana. Unlike recent times, the T-Shirts aren’t in-your-face, loud designs. Instead, it seems that fashions favorite T-Shirts these days are more sophisticated.

Take, for example, Vetements. The brand has recently released their popular yellow and red DHL T-Shirts for their Spring 2016 collection. What’s more, they completely sold out of these T-Shirts – even with a $330 (£250) price tag!

vetements-dhl-tshirt.jpg

Since the release, knockoffs were being sold on sites such as Ebay for a much more cost-effective £10.

Since then, they’ve gone on to add American T-Shirt manufacturer Hanes to their growing list of collaborators. Even Gucci is getting in on the act by showing off logo tees in their recent resort collection.

It seems that this trend isn’t just limited to the runway either. One of the most popular trends this summer is slip dresses that are styled on a basic T-Shirt. Justin Bieber T-Shirts are also selling as part of his tour merchandise at Barneys in New York.

T-Shirts haven’t always been a coveted garment inside a woman’s wardrobe. The modern day T-Shirt has an unfashionable great grandfather: a men’s underwear staple from the early 1900’s. By the 1950’s, T-Shirts with university and rock band logos had made their way into the mainstream – helping to grow the popularity of T-Shirts in general.

gucci-tshirt

The reason for this resurgence isn’t fully known, however, it’s believed that the cyclical nature of the fashion industry has impacted this. Labels are believed to be offering more consumer-friendly clothing by adding practical and mass-produced clothing to their lineup.

“We’re seeing a return to the sensibility of the ’90’s, which was the last time logo mania was everywhere,” Stephanie Solomon, the fashion director at Lord and Taylor, recently said in an interview. “It was also a time when there was an upheaval in fashion, [simlar to] now with the changing of the guard with Demna Gvasalia at Vetements and Balenciaga and Alessandro Michele at Gucci. Part of the fashion uniform then was the logo tee and showing belief in the brand’s values by wearing it. Today, everyone’s reasserting their brand fidelities.”

The T-Shirt, for many, is a gateway item as it opens up the demographics for each brand. “These T-Shirts are usually the most inexpensive thing in designer collections,” Solomon added. “[Women are] buying into the brand at their opening price point. The customer is making a statement that she’s aligned with the brand.”

The best part about the trend: You probably have some form of it in your closet already! “The trend has no age boundaries – it resonates at all age groups – and price isn’t necessarily going to be a restriction.” It’s a piece of timeless fashion that’s now being claimed by high-end designers, yet it’s completely accessible to everyone.

What could possibly be better than that?

One trend that never seems to go away though is creating your own unique T-Shirts. This gives you the freedom to create high-street style designs that are completely unique – meaning that you won’t see anyone else wearing them as you walk down the high street.

If you’re looking for T-Shirt printing in the UK, then Garment Printing is the perfect choice, they offer excellent personalisation techniques, excellent pricing and super fast delivery on all of their orders.

So if you’re looking to get your own T-Shirts knocked up for the summer (or the autumn, winter or spring) then head on over to their website and start creating your own custom T-Shirts quickly and easily.

A Guide to starting your own Urban Streetwear Brand

The urban streetwear scene is a crowded place with a lot of copycat designers out there. If you’re serious about creating a unique brand but aren’t sure where to start, follow our start-up guide for some tips on how to survive in a saturated market.

Don’t rush into it

First things first – do not rush your ideas. Figure out exactly what you want to sell, where you want to sell it and consider how profitable you want your business to be. Garments cost money, printing costs money and shipping costs money, so make sure to do your sums and look around for the best deals before you even consider getting to work on your designs.

There are a lot of different designers out there, so you’ll also want to consider initial ways you can help yourself stand out from the crowd. Creating designs that mean something to you are important but when creating a streetwear brand you need to think with your head, not your heart.

Find a reliable printer

Next, you’ll want to find a reliable printing company that can cater to your needs. Finding a good quality printer before you get too far into the design process will help you work out an approximate initial cost for your ideas. You’ll want to know that the prints are high quality and that both shorter and larger runs can be catered to, so that you can start off small and adjust your requirements as you grow.

Ask yourself – are you looking to embroider your designs, print them or both? You may not have completely decided upon your preferred method just yet, so ensure that the company you choose allows you to experiment with a range of different printing and embroidery techniques. The more choice you have, the more complex you can make your apparel and the wider the range will be that you can offer.

Ask yourself: What do you want to say?

Following on from the head and heart debate, you’ll next want to focus on your message. Try to tap into a market that isn’t there yet but that you think should be and build your brand message from this. There are many niche areas to explore within urban streetwear but if you are aiming for something completely unique you need to head into uncharted territory.

A strong message is incredibility important with streetwear. Whether it’s political, cultural, social or personal you should aim to create something that evokes a reaction. From the name of your brand, to the designs and marketing, you need to show people that you are a fierce and fiery company with bags of attitude.

Not a designer? Draft in some outside help

There is nothing more detrimental to an urban streetwear brand than bad design. Not everyone who wants to start an urban clothing brand has the necessary design skills to craft the apparel artwork – and that’s okay.

However, going it alone and creating a substandard design does not make business sense and will not help your start-up company to flourish. If you don’t have any graphic designer friends to help you out, you can find a freelancer online. Prices vary depending on a freelancers experience but there’s something out there for everyone.

Focus on your marketing

Finally, you’ll want to dedicate a serious amount of time marketing your brand. Designing your streetwear and marketing your company go side by side because you’ll want to drum up some positive responses and a good following for your product launch.

If you’re on a small budget, focus on harnessing the power of social media to promote your brand. Follow influential streetwear designers and apparel lovers on Twitter, research the best Instagram hashtags to use on your photos and if you have the budget for it, pay for sponsored advertising on sites such as Facebook. By interlinking and weaving your brand into different sites, you can create a strong message about who you are and what you stand for.

Remember…

Most importantly of all, always keep a clear head no matter where you go with your brand and try not to get distracted from your end goal. If you can combine great business sense with a passion for urban streetwear, you’ll be well on your way to creating a successful urban brand. We are here for all your printing needs – http://www.garmentprinting.co.uk

The Evolution of the Rugby Kit

The rugby kit has come a long way since the sport began to gain notoriety in the early 1900s. The rugby kits of today are perfectly designed to make play as easy as possible and have developed as rapidly as the sport itself. Over a hundred years have passed since the sport first began, so how did the rugby kit get from where it was then to where it is now?

When rugby first began being played professionally, the kits focussed less on ergonomic design and more on a gentlemanly appearance. Rugby tops actually consisted of long sleeved button down shirts and at the very beginning players even wore a bow tie onto the pitch. Thick baggy shorts and sturdy walking boots were also part of the get up, making the first rugby ‘kits’ something to be desired.

When looking at rugby attire from the early 1900s, it is easy to see how the game gained the title ‘the gentlemen’s sport’. There were very few changes to the kit over the following decades, although some of the more extravagant elements disappeared. By the 1980s, the bow ties were ditched in favour of shirts with unbuttoned collars and the walking boot was substituted for the studded sports trainer.

It wasn’t until the 1990s that the older elements of previous rugby kits seem to disappear. The designers still hadn’t got it quite right though, as they swapped buttoned shirts for heavy cotton jumpers. These jumpers were never ideal, as they soaked up thick mud and water on the pitch, making players very uncomfortable after 80 minutes play time.

The shirts, jumpers and shorts were also a disadvantage for many players before newer kits were designed, as they allowed opposing players to easy grab and take down their opponents. Despite this being a big problem for a number of years, it wasn’t until the summer of 2003 that the old baggy shirts were switched in favour of tighter fitting kits.

The tighter fit rugby kits added a new element of difficulty to the game and helped the sport evolve even further. It ensured that opposing team players had to use their skills and expertise to find new ways of tackling players, making the game more exciting.

The new streamlined kits have also changed materials too. Rather than using heavy cotton, kits now use a cotton-polyester blend that moves with the players as they run through the field. This modern design also incorporates breathable patches, to make players time on the pitch a little more comfortable.

New materials, clever designs and a desire to develop the sport have all led to the evolution of the rugby kit. From gentleman beginnings to the sleek modern designs of the 2000s, the history of the kit is a fascinating one.

How to Organize an Event For Your Business?

Business events are the perfect opportunity to demonstrate your products, gain new clients and generally help to create a positive image and buzz for your brand. No matter what the size of your business, events are a great tool if they are used properly. So, how can you ensure that you have properly prepared for your event?

Audiences & end goals

Before all else, you will need to consider your target market and the end goal that you want to achieve from the event. It’s important not to get too caught up over the silly added extras that you think might look good. Finishing touches are nice and will add personalisation to an event but if it’s all frills and not much else, you might end up losing money, rather than gaining clients and expanding your customer base.

When considering your target audience, you want to keep in mind that the event needs to be mutually beneficial. Ask yourself: What are my guests expecting to gain from this event? What kind of audience will help me to expand my business? How can I turn skeptical guests into new clients?

From the speeches you make to the way you layout the tables, everything you do should be tailored to ensure your visitors have a memorable experience. Careful consideration of your target audience will ensure that you not only enhance the number of potential follow ups, but that your actions make a lasting impact on your clients as well.

Money, money, money

Another important thing to consider when planning an event is a strong, solid budget. Most people will pull together some kind of budget for their event, but it needs to be precise and carefully thought out to minimize the risk of overspending.

Try not to just randomly pick an overall figure for the event. If you consider each element, such as lighting, refreshments and finishing touches separately, you’re much less likely to throw money away on unnecessary things. It’s also advisable to factor a small amount of ‘spare’ money into your budget, just in case there are any unexpected costs that you may not have considered. That way, if a problem arises you can easily cover it with no stress. Alternatively, if nothing goes wrong you’ll have saved yourself some money.

…and relax?

Once your event is over, you can breathe a little sigh of relief – but don’t get too comfortable too soon. The absolute best thing you can do after an event has taken place is assess how it went. Whether this is directly after, or a few months down the line when attendees have made a decision on your products, assessing the outcome is crucial.

Look at what went right, what went wrong and discuss ways that you and your colleagues might be able to adapt and evolve the event next time round. Finally, tie up all those loose ends. Chase up any potential leads and be sure to say thank you to everyone who attended, a friendly business is a memorable one.

If you would like any promotional materials for your new business or event,visit Garment Printing. 

Three Small Businesses with Effective Branding

Branding is important for any business but getting it right if you’re an SME is crucial if you want to reach out and inspire as many people as possible. It doesn’t matter whether you are a charity or a clothing line, branding is everything. Bigger companies have advertisers, graphic designers and a whole host of other clued up professionals at their disposal, so it’s not always easy if you’re one of the little guys.

Looking for some inspiration? These three businesses are getting it right when it comes to effectively branding their products.

Tencel

Tencel is the brand name of the eco-friendly fibre loving crafted by the House of Lenzing. The branding for Tencel is simple but incredibly effective, clearly representing its ethical roots.

A material that is softer than silk, more absorbent than cotton and creates minimal impact on the environment. Tencel is a firm favourite of environmentally friendly companies who want printed garments for marketing purposes, without adding to the ecological damage caused by the production of other garment materials.

The branding of Tencel clearly demonstrates what it is and why it’s different from other fibres. This clear branding is effective because it gives the fibre its own identity, something that is vitally important for a new or small business.

Meals That Heal

Personal cookery coach Karen Maidment focuses her efforts on a number of different cooking and health adventures. The garments that Karen had made up to promote her book ‘Meals that Heal’ is the perfect example of small business branding done right.

Meals That Heal promotes the idea of cooking and eating to control and cure uncomfortable diseases and conditions such as IBS. The recipes and the book in general focus on natural clean, green eating and her branding clearly reflects this.

Karen used naturally coloured aprons and a nature inspired green logo on all of her garments to successfully tie her branding together in a creative and inspiring way.

Cancer is a Drag

A small charity that raises money to help fund cancer patients, Cancer is a Drag has a fantastically quirky logo that gives the small team exactly what they need to stand out amongst other cancer charities.

Officially launched at 2012 London Pride by its founder Alan Bugg, the charity uses drag nights and other pride events to raise funds for better awareness and financial help to those who need it most.

Printed t-shirts were an obvious choice to create branding buzz for this organisation, because their unique ribbon/drag-queen crossover logo works perfectly on all types of apparel. The design is bright, fun and most importantly of all, it grabs people’s attention. Thanks to all their branding and hard work, the charity has raised enough money to join the Charity Commission and give out over £2000 in grants to help vulnerable cancer suffers.

These organisations prove that you don’t need big money to make a big impact. What does your branding say about your small business?